• Minimal Vandalism, 2012

    Steel, concrete, wood, varnish

    Installation view

  • Minimal Vandalism (Box), 2012

    Wood, varnish

    150 x 300 x 36 cm

  • Minimal Vandalism (Box), 2012

    Wood, varnish

    150 x 300 x 36 cm

  • Minimal Vandalism (Rack), 2012

    Steel, varnish

    75 x 310 x 75 cm

  • Minimal Vandalism (Rack), 2012

    Steel, varnish

    75 x 310 x 75 cm

  • Minimal Vandalism (Grid|Plateau), 2012

    Steel, concrete, varnish

    225 x 120 x 5 cm | 300 x 240 x 4 cm

  • Minimal Vandalism (Plateau), 2012

    Concrete, varnish

    300 x 240 x 4 cm

  • Minimal Vandalism (Grid), 2012

    Steel, varnish

    225 x 120 x 5 cm

  • Minimal Vandalism (Lines), 2012

    Steel, concrete, varnish

    12 x 255 x 80 cm

  • Minimal Vandalism (Lines), 2012

    Steel, concrete, varnish

    12 x 255 x 80 cm

KAY WALKOWIAK
MINIMAL VANDALISM

Performance and short film production
with Kilian Martin and Brett Novak.

04.08. - 07.08.2012
Generali Foundation, Vienna

With the emergence of Minimal Art in the 60s, the way we experience art changes fundamentally. With their set-ups of simple geometric objects, artists such as Robert Morris create choreographies, activate the space and thus the viewer.  Half a century later the short film Minimal Vandalism by Kay Walkowiak deals with the central challenge of Minimalism, and examines its impact on contemporary art production and conditions for art reception alike. 

The video work combines the outside with the inside of the White Cube of the Generali Foundation in Vienna: the professional skateboarder Kilian Martin (Los Angeles) uses post-minimalist sculptures by Walkowiak as obstacles and cites elements from freestyle as well as popular street skateboarding in his masterly skate performance. 

Minimal Vandalism produces a choreography which integrates sculpture and highly stylized skateboarding culture, and in which the human body is used to test the boundaries of sculpture. 

Not unlike Robert Morris with his iconic show Bodyspacemotionthings in 1974, Kay Walkowiak turns the exhibition space into a playground and a stage, on which questions of social spaces are negotiated in practice.

Celina Basra